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Customer Journeys can be tricky buggers

Customer Journeys can be tricky buggers…

By | Customer experience, Fintech, Lean Thinking, Management | No Comments

Recently, we moved our business bank accounts from one of the major banks to another. We’d had repeatedly bad service to the point where going through the hassle of changing banks was better than stay where we were.

By and large, it’s been ok. Not great, but OK. Would I recommend our new bank? Probably not. Would I warn people not to use them? Probably not either.

I’m completely ‘meh’ about them. Here’s why.

Today, I received an email from them (a real email!) saying I had IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS added to my library. IF that wasn’t enough it went on to say “Please take some time to read it as soon as possible, as it may need a response.”

So I duly logged into my online banking to read this incredibly important message. You see, a few weeks ago I opened a second bank account with this bank.

I open my messages to find… a letter advising me that they have set up online banking for me.

They literally just told me to log into my online banking so I could read a letter confirming I have online banking! Obviously completely unnecessary.

It likely stems from moving all the old world paper-based comms into the digital world, without really taking the time to understand how the message changes or is impacted by the digital world. We see this all the time. A kind of ‘lift and shift’ from paper to digital. It creates a poor and clunky customer journey.

The problem with this is that they took up my time reading the email they sent me. More time logging into online banking with its 2 stage verification. Then downloading the letter itself and reading it. 10 minutes of my time wasted.

Things like this are important – not because it will make a customer leave, but because it’s death by 1000 cuts. It adds to my overall sense of being underwhelmed with the bank.

And there have been other examples of this. Like the time I first used their online banking. I went to pay all my staff and they flagged all the payments as potential fraud. I had to call them to verify the payments. Extra layers of security including explaining what each payment was for (why would they need to know that!?). When I asked why these had been flagged, the response?

“Well sir, you have to admit it’s highly suspicious when you’ve only had your account open for a few weeks and you start making large payments. Of course it’s going to trigger an alert with us”.

It’s a business bank account! Of course there are going to be large transactions moving through it.

I can’t be the only employer out there who pay’s their staff, right? Or have I got this whole running a business thing mixed up?

I have more little examples of time wasting but I’ve taken up enough of yours. I won’t be leaving the bank unless (until?) things start to go really bad, but I won’t be advocating them to anyone. No referral business will be generated from me.

And that’s a missed opportunity if I ever saw one.